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Insert Node Security Considerations

Although the accessibility of the node and comments are checked, it is a good idea to see this module as a security risk giving users a way to display nodes otherwise forbidden to them.

Because a lot of the data is used unfiltered, it is strongly suggest that you pay very close attention to the order of your filters. If you authorize this module to your users (i.e. where they can select an Input filter that includes this specific filter,) then look into checking the HTML code after this filter. Otherwise, a user could inject some unwanted HTML code1

  • 1. Of course, the inclusion of a node should

Insert Node Parameter: cck (6-1.2)

The CCK parameter let you insert one of your CCK field and some node fields that cannot otherwise be added without being themed.

We support CCK fields and several special field names as follow.

Fields that appeared after version 6-1.2 have a version specified between parenthesis (i.e. 6-1.3).

cck=field_<name>; [requires CCK]

The CCK parameter must be followed by a field name. An empty name is likely to generate an error. The name of a field that does not exist is likely to generate nothing.

For instance, if you have a field named see_also, you would write:

   cck=field_see_also;

Insert Node Parameter: comments (6-1.1) [no content]

Attach the comments at the bottom of the node data.

The comments will be shown just as in the regular page (i.e. flat, thread, expanded, collapsed.)

Note that this data is considered a [no content] because it does not affect the use of the "default" parameter. However, it definitively adds content to your output.

CSS Class: div.insert-node-comments

Theme: InsertNode_comments

IMPORTANT NOTES

The comments are appended to anything else that you have inserted. You cannot use the order of your parameters to put the comments in a different location. In order to do that, use multiple

Insert Node Usage

Syntax

The Insert node tag syntax is:

   [node:<name of node> <parameters>]

Name of node

The <name of node> can either be

  • The name of the node, i.e. it's URL without the protocol and domain1, or
  • The node identifier (the number you see in your URL when you edit the node), or
  • An asterisk (*) in which case the current node applies2
    • 1. For instance, to insert this very node, I would use the name doc_insert_node_usage.
    • 2. The asterisk is useful to repeat something from the node in a block. This could be the title of the node or a CCK field. I would suggest ...

Store Register

SWF Action
Action Category: 
Variables
Action Details: 
0
Action Identifier: 
135
Action Structure: 
unsigned char   f_register;
Action Length: 
1 byte(s)
Action Stack: 
pop 1 (a), push 1 (a)
Action Operation: 
a1 := pop();
target.g_register[f_register] = a1;
push(a1);
Action Flash Version: 
5

Pop one value from the stack, push it back on the stack and also store it in one of 4 or 256 registers which number is specified in the tag (0, 1, 2 or 3 only if not in a Declare Function (V7). I tried other numbers and they don't work in SWF version 6 or older.) Until set a register has the value undefined. The value of a register can be retrieved with a Push Data action and the register type with the matching register number.

Set Target

SWF Action
Action Category: 
Movie
Action Details: 
(dynamic)
Action Identifier: 
139
Action Structure: 
string   f_target;
Action Length: 
-1 byte(s)
Action Stack: 
n.a.
Action Operation: 
set_target(f_target);
Action Flash Version: 
1

If the string f_target is the empty string, then the next actions apply to the main movie.

Otherwise it is the name of a Sprite and the followings actions apply to that Sprite only.

In order to use a dynamic name for the target, use Set Target (dynamic) instead.

Push Data

SWF Action
Action Category: 
Stack
Action Details: 
0
Action Identifier: 
150
Action Structure: 
struct {
	unsigned char   f_type
	<type>          f_data
} f_push_data[<variable>];
Action Length: 
-1 byte(s)
Action Stack: 
push <variable> (a)
Action Operation: 
a1 = f_data[0];1
push(a1);
a2 = f_data[1];
push(a2);
a3 = f_data[2];
push(a3);
...
an = f_data[n];
push(an);
  • 1. Notice that the first data in the action is the last accessible on your stack.
Action Flash Version: 
4
See Also: 

Push some immediate data on the stack. This action was introduced in V4.0. The supported data types vary depending on the version of the player you have. As many values as necessary can be pushed at once. The f_push_data structure will be repeated multiple times as required. For instance, to push two strings on the stack at once, you would use the following code:

Implements

SWF Action
Action Category: 
Objects
Action Details: 
0
Action Identifier: 
44
Action Structure: 
<n.a.>
Action Length: 
0 byte(s)
Action Stack: 
pop 1 (o), pop 1 (i), pop i2 (o)
Action Operation: 
o1 := pop();
i2 := pop();
for (idx := 3; idx <= i2 + 2; ++idx) {
  oidx := pop();
}
o1 implements o3, o4, o5, ... , o(i2 +2)
Action Flash Version: 
7

This action declares an object as a sub-class of one or more interfaces. The syntax here is simple, the real implementation is quite unbelievably difficult to fathom.

The following shows you how you can add an implements of interfaces "A" and "B" to the class "C". Notice that class "C" needs to already exist. Here we assume that all classes are defined in the global scope.

	push data "_global"
	get variable
	push data "A"
	get member
	push data "_global"
	get variable
	push data "B"
	get ...

Sprite Properties

The following is the list of currently accepted properties or fields for the Get Property and the Set Property actions. Note that the properties can be specified with either an integer (type 7, requires V5.0+) or a single precision floating point (type 1, V4.0 compatible). And since strings are automatically transformed in a value when required, one can use a string to represent the property number (type 0).

SWF Internal Functions

Since Flash version 5, you can use internal functions (really member functions or methods of internal objects.) These functions are always available. These methods are called using the Call Function action with the name of the object and function separated by a period. A few of these internal functions are duplicates of some direct action script instructions. In general, it is preferred to use these internal functions rather than the direct action. However, direct actions are a good way to optimize your ActionScript code.

Similarly, you can access internal constants (really variable ...