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Is the Open Source costing us money?

More and more, enterprises make use of Open Source software. Why is this a good idea for your company as well?

Many people are scared to do the move. The result is very costly. When you use proprietary software, each time you need an upgrade, you need to pay for it. And in most cases, it is not just once, but a number of times equal to the number of computers you own or the number of staff that use the software. A $200 software may sound really cheap. But if you have 1000 staff, it makes it $200,000.

This is of course very good business for the vendors. However, many small companies just ...

New Professional Developer Tools

Made to Order Software Corporation is proud to present three new products, announced at the Linux on Wall Street conference in New York City, New York!

  • molib™

A robust application toolkit library, molib gives you the power to develop cross-platform applications quickly and easily. It abstracts operating system calls through C++ objects (i.e. moFile and moDirectory abstract access to the file system, moDatabase to a database of your choice and moApplication to the system environment). This lets you write code once to create applications which compile and ...

Made to Order Software at Linux on Wall Street

Made to Order Software Corporation is proud to announce that it will be presenting three new products at the Linux on Wall Street conference in the heart of New York City, New York at the Roosevelt Hotel on Monday, April 23, 2007!

Please come and visit us between 8am and 4pm EST at booth #225. Scroll down to the bottom of this article to get your free pass!

  • molib™

A robust application toolkit library, molib gives you the power to develop cross-platform applications quickly and easily. It abstracts operating system calls through C++ objects (i.e. moFile and ...

Creating Turn Watcher — An Adventure Unto Itself

I think I'm like just about everyone else. I have the work 'me' and the play 'me'. Only difference is, the two once merged, and what was born was Turn Watcher.

I have played in D&D campaigns for many years, but never thought of running my own campaign until I got a very unusual present for my 40th birthday — the Dungeon Master's Guide. I started reading the book and was hooked. How fun I thought it would be to create encounters and intriguing situations and worlds for my players. It wasn't until I ran my first game that I realized that it would take more ...