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PHP eFax v1.1 released

In 2007, Made to Order Software created a software package to support the eFax protocol using PHP. Early in 2008, we offered the package for your developers to send faxes from your web server in just minutes anywhere in the world. Now, we offer PHP eFax version 1.1 that not only sends faxes, it also parses inbound faxes with a single call to the PHP eFax object.

eFax® is a company offering a reliable system to send and receive faxes cheaply. Their system works with the Internet and thus is directly accessible to your web server.

This newer version includes Unit Tests that are used to ...

Order Made!® version 1.10

We have finally published version 1.10 of Order Made!®

This version include one important change: the ® after Order Made!. Made to Order Software now owns the Order Made!® trademark.

We also included a few bug fixes, mostly transparent to our users.

LinuxWorld Conference & Expo 2008

This year, 2008, I decided to register and go to LinuxWorld. It is in August and my kids are not at school so it was easy to manage. Also, I had to go to the French consulate to get a birth certificate for my daughter. In other words, I had the chance to do two things at once!

I found it quite interesting to hear that many people were not too excited about the event. Many of the people walking around are like me: they themselves sell their own Linux solution. In other words, they are not going to be customers. I had the chance to talk with Roger Levi, the Vice President of the Open Platform ...

July 2008, a new limit reached!

I heard of Voyager 2 and the fact that it was still functional: 30 years after it left Earth! Just that is amazing to me.

The craft went through the termination shock several times now (5 if I’m correct). This is far. Further away from the Sun than Pluto. And Pluto is on average around 39.5 AU from the Sun. It is even further than Eris and Eris lies at about 67 AU on average.

Amazon Checkout and Simple Pay

This week, Amazon published a brand new set of tools for merchants. We already had PayPal and Google Checkout, now we have the same with Amazon.

AJAX, CSS, HTML, XML, SOAP, LAMP… and now Web 2.0?

Dear reader,

Yes. With all these terms, it is quite easy to get lost.

As a developer, my skills are quite extensive. I started with Logo, learned assembly language, BASIC, C, C++… and all these other languages in between, those that most people pass by such as Ada, Eiffel, Icon… And the languages you kind of have to learn because you’re in it: Bourne Shell, configuration files for 100 different software, Makefile, etc.

And once you know all of these languages, you think you’re done. Well… Not quite!

The web has got it’s own set of languages! It

Security Issues with the US government

Some people, I have noticed, have been skeptical about the amount of care taken by the US government and agencies in the last few years. Companies are also catching up. The security measures change every year, when not every semester, every month and for some, probably every day.

For sure, making sure that the most wanted information remains top-secret, you need top level security features on your network. I do not know how much data is of interest, but I found out today that there are hackers attacking the federal websites quite a bit…

“The Pentagon last month acknowledged ...

Is the Open Source costing us money?

More and more, enterprises make use of Open Source software. Why is this a good idea for your company as well?

Many people are scared to do the move. The result is very costly. When you use proprietary software, each time you need an upgrade, you need to pay for it. And in most cases, it is not just once, but a number of times equal to the number of computers you own or the number of staff that use the software. A $200 software may sound really cheap. But if you have 1000 staff, it makes it $200,000.

This is of course very good business for the vendors. However, many small companies just ...

The odbcpp library is now available!

Made to Order Software now uses the ODBC library with its modb library (which is part of our molib product.) Unfortunately, it is not only written in C, it generates many errors. Actually, every single function has the potential of returning an error. For this reason, using the C interface is simply not a safe option.

For this reason, Alexis Wilke, our CEO, wrote an C++ wrapper called odbcpp. It encapsulates all the necessary ODBC calls to access any ODBC compatible database.

The odbcpp library ensures the proper management of all the resources for you. It allocates and frees the handles as ...

Pointers and proper exception handling...

Many C++ programmers have been C programmers first. Therefore, a lot of times, you find statements written this way:

ptr = new type;

if(ptr == 0) // handle error...

This is a C programmer that does not yet know that the new operator will throw an error if the allocation cannot happen. This makes a lot of sense, but what does that mean to the C++ programmer?